Korn - Follow The Leader - Review
← 875 album.png 877 →

critics' view

Love 'em or despise 'em, you've got to give Korn props for kick-starting a new metal movement that blends aggressive hip-hop rhythms with roaring hate-metal riffs. In the wake of the band's 1994 debut, many like-minded groups cropped up, including Deftones, Snot, and Limp Bizkit. But with the release of Korn's disappointing 1996 sophomore effort, Life Is Peachy, the imitators seemed likely to usurp the innovators. Maybe that's why Follow the Leader is so crafty and inspired. Instead of continuing on cruise control, Korn have diversified their formula, experimenting with mood and dynamics while intensifying their melody and noise thresholds. "Got the Life" blends a seductive disco beat and vocals reminiscent of "Epic"-era Faith No More with oppressive guitar chimes and squawks. "Children of the Korn" features a propulsive rap beat, throbbing bass lines, and angry guest vocals by Ice Cube. But just when Korn's groovin' psychedelic fury starts to make listeners see red, the band lashes out with "All in the Family," a hilarious rap-metal diss-fest duet with Limp Bizkit's Fred Durst, that proves Korn are much more than the sum of their rage.

Jon Wiederhorn
amazon.com (editorial review) external-link.png

amazon-usa.png
Est. 1994. Online Shopping for Electronics, Apparel, Computers, Books, music, DVDs, videos, electronics, computers and much more. Amazon distributes downloads and streaming of video, music, audiobook through its Amazon Prime Video, Amazon Music, and Audible subsidiaries.
amazon.com external-link.png
twitter.png facebook.png





Care to share?

(if so, thanks!)

© The Jukebox Rebel 2005-2019. All rights reserved. Third-party trademarks and content are the property of their respective owners, and subject to their own copyright terms and conditions. See the website links provided in each case.