Brian Eno - Ambient 1ː Music For Airports - Review
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critics' view

With his 1978 album Ambient 1: Music for Airports, English musician/producer/conceptualist Brian Eno coined the terms “Discreet Music” and “Ambient” as “music designed to induce calm and space to think.” The album, comprised of four dissimilar yet completely cohesive movements, was created with simple keyboard melodies, serial tape loops and embedded voices. The effect is sheer weightlessness, the disc’s soft ebb and flow of synthesized patterns imbued with live brass and strings. More than just spatial white noise, Music for Airports is the sonic equivalent of visual art. Eno’s sculpture of sound has inspired numerous imitations, briefly fulfilling its postmodern destiny as an audio installation at NYC’s LaGuardia Airport.

Sal Cinquemani
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Co-founded by Ed Gonzalez and Sal Cinquemani in 2001, Slant Magazine has become known for its edgy, irreverent, and often funny pop cultural criticism. Using a grassroots approach, the site has carved a unique niche for itself in both the online film and music circles.
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