Blood, Sweat and Tears - Blood, Sweat And Tears - Review
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critics' view

Best known for playing the organ on Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone," Al Kooper formed the jazz-tinged, horn-heavy Blood, Sweat & Tears in 1967 but left following the band's first album, the psychedelic Child Is the Father to the Man. In came booming singer David Clayton-Thomas, and the group followed up their debut with this eclectic self-titled LP that features covers of Traffic's "Smiling Phases," Laura Nyro's "And When I Die," and Billie Holiday's "God Bless the Child," as well as the hit "Spinning Wheel." The chart-topping Blood, Sweat and Tears remains a pioneering classic in the fusion genre, marrying jazzy horns, pop melody, and classical counterpoint into a cohesive album.

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